OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Buxaceae, Boxwood family, as understood by Vascular Flora of the Carolinas.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Allegheny-spurge, Mountain Pachysandra

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Pachysandra procumbens   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Pachysandra procumbens   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Pachysandra procumbens 108-01-001   FAMILY: Buxaceae

 

Habitat: Moist rich forests, mainly over calcareous or mafic rocks

Rare

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon Common Name: Pachysandra, Japanese-spurge

Weakley's Flora: (4/14/23) Pachysandra terminalis   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Pachysandra terminalis   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Pachysandra terminalis 108-01-002   FAMILY: Buxaceae

 

Habitat: Persistent after cultivation, and spreading vegetatively to adjacent forests; commonly cultivated, rarely persistent to naturalized

Waif(s)

Non-native: China & Japan

 


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Common Name: Boxwood, Common Box

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Buxus sempervirens   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Buxus sempervirens   FAMILY: Buxaceae

 

Habitat: Persistent for decades at abandoned homesites, and spreading weakly from dumped hedge trimmings and other cuttings

Waif(s)

Non-native: Europe

 


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"The botanist is required to know methods of precise identification based on minute observation, often requiring the use of a magnifying glass or microscope. But practical identification is based on details clearly seen by the eye." — George W.D. Symonds, The Tree Identification Book